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/academics/schools/engineering/graduate/masters/electrical/
 

Contact

    • School of Engineering

      • Kirkbride Hall
      • tel: 610-499-4037
      • fax: 610-499-4059
    • Dr. Sohail Sheikh

      • Chairman of Electrical Engineering
      • Kirkbride Hall, Room 369A
      • tel: 610-499-4567
      • ssheikh@widener.edu
    • Jill Gilbert

Curriculum: Master of Science in Engineering, Electrical

Requirements

The master's degree in electrical engineering requires a minimum of 30 credits with or without a thesis. The dual MSE/MBA program’s credit requirements vary according to the undergraduate business courses completed. Master’s candidates are required to maintain at least a B average. Courses for which grades received are lower than B-minus may only be repeated with  permission of the graduate committee. Engineering Mathematics I or Engineering Statistics & Probability, Engineering Project Management, and Technical Communications courses are core courses. Technical electives may be chosen from the prescribed subgroups to meet the educational goals of the students.

Courses

Here is a selection of courses students typically take as part of the electrical engineering graduate program.

ENGR 616 ENGINEERING MATHEMATICS I

The course begins with a review of linear algebra, matrices, and determinants. Later topics include solution of linear equations, Eigen-value problems, power series, Fourier series, elements of numerical analysis of ordinary and partial differential equations using software techniques search techniques.

ENGR 618 PROBABILITY AND STATISTICS

Topics include probability and random variables; sets, events, and probability space; joint, conditional, and total probability; Bayes' theorem; combinatorics; continuous and discrete distributions; sampling distributions; parameter estimation; hypothesis testing; regression analysis; analysis of variance; and stochastic processes. 

ENGR 619 TECHNICAL COMMUNICATIONS

This course provides practical experience in written and oral communication techniques for technical material. A major focus is analyzing audiences and purpose for individual situations. Audiences range from expert and technical to lay; the purpose varies from simply describing and informing to deftly instructing and persuading. Through didactic materials, text examples, and online activities, students craft documents and presentations on their own topics. Students also review the practical elements of grammar and syntax critical for controlling flow, emphasis, and clarity.

EE 644 MICROWAVE DEVICES & CIRCUITS

This course presents the basic principles, characteristics, and applications of commonly used microwave devices and techniques for analyzing and designing microwave circuits. Topics include aspects of plane wave propagation, reflection and transmission, transmission line theory, Smith charts, impedance matching, waveguides, microwave cavities, S-parameters, hybrid circuits, couplers, isolators, transistors, tunnel diodes, TEDs, ATTDs, linear beam tubes (Klystrons), strip lines, and microstrip.

EE 645 OPTICAL COMMUNICATION SYSTEMS

This course explores the operation of generic optical communication systems through an in-depth treatment of both the individual system components, such as optical sources (LED/LD), detectors (PIN/APD), and optical fiber (Multimode, SI, GRIN, DSF), as well as the integrated system characteristics (rise-time, bandwidth, data rate, eye diagrams, attenuation, PB). In addition, the course will cover optical amplifiers (EDFA), which have been responsible for the current trend toward wave-division multiplexing (WDM) in long haul, large capacity data systems. Fundamental principles in semiconductor concepts, electromagnetic theory, communications theory, and electronics will be discussed.

EE 647 SATELLITE COMMUNICATIONS

This course is an introduction to theory and applications of satellite communications. Topics include both geosynchronous and non-geosynchronous satellite orbits, ground station look angles, signal propagation, link budgets, noise models, modulation, coding, noise reduction, ground station systems, and applications. Special emphasis is placed on understanding and implementing the relevant calculations.

EE 648 GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION PROCESSING

This course presents computations, analytical methods, and graphical representation for geographical information systems (GIS). Topics include spherical trigonometry, data models, coordinated transformations, digital filtering, terrain mapping, analysis of attributes over terrain, and spatial interpolation. In homework assignments and classroom workshops, students use these computational methods for processing of geographic information. Applications to electromagnetic wave propagation, magnetic field surveys, and hydrology are offered as extended examples. Coursework requires the use of a mathematical analysis package.

ENGR 649 DIGITAL NETWORK SWITCHING

This course covers the following: Switching fundamentals–matrix, multistage, shared memory, bus, and multiple bus switching fabrics; blocking, strictly nonblocking, and rearrangeable nonblocking switches. Space-division, time-division, and combined space- and time-division switching. Controller-based and self-routing switching; synchronous, frame, and cell/packet switching; Clos, Benes, Banyon, Knockout, Multistage Batcher- Banyon, Tandem Banyon, shuffle, toroidal, and recirculating switches. Buffer strategies, cut-through switching, multicasting, and priority handling; optical switching. Throughput, delay, and complexity performance analysis and implementation issues. Switching architectures for telephone, local-area to broadband networks, asynchronous transfer mode, and communication satellites, and their interconnections.

EE 652 WIRELESS & CELLULAR TELECOMMUNICATION

Topics include mobile and fixed wireless systems—cellular and point-to-point technologies. Wireless LANs, wireless STM (synchronous transfer mode), wireless cable, wireless local loops, microwave and satellite systems, cordless telephones, PCS (personal communication systems), and multimedia and video mobile services. Cellular concepts for macro-, micro-, and picocellular networks; frequency reuse, hand-offs, channel interference. Radio propagation effects of reflection, diffraction and scattering; use of microwave, millimeter, and optical infrared frequencies; climactic effects, directional and multiple antennas. Large-scale propagation models of path loss in irregular terrain, urban areas, microcells, and buildings. Small-scale models of fading, time-delay spread, and Doppler spread due to multipaths, movement of transmitter/receivers, or of surrounding objects and transmission bandwidth; statistical models of fading. Digital modulation—QAM (quadrature amplitude modulation), MSK (minimum shift keying), Gaussian MSK, spread spectrum, adaptive and multicarrier modulation. Signal processing to improve quality; adaptive equalization, diversity techniques, block and convolutional coding, trelliscoded modulation. Access methods—time, frequency, and spacedivision, frequency hopping and code division, and random access packet radio. inter-networking, signaling, and national and international standards.

EE 657 COMMUNICATIONS SYSTEMS

This course is an advanced level presentation of the fundamental concepts employed in modern communications. Topics include linear and nonlinear analog modulation; pulse code modulation methods; digital modulation (OOK, PSK, FSK, etc.), and coding methods; system concepts and system performance in the presence of noise. Prerequisite: Knowledge of Fourier analysis, probability, and statistics through appropriate course work.

EE 659 DIGITAL SIGNAL PROCESSING

Topics include a review of sampling; properties of discrete-time signals and linear systems; Fourier analysis of continuous and discrete-time signals; the z-transform and its properties; sampling in time and frequency; the discrete-time Fourier transform (DFT); implementation of FIR and IIR discrete-time systems; design of FIR and IIR digital filters. Prerequisites: Knowledge of the continuous-time Fourier transform; some familiarity with discrete-time systems and the z-transform is recommended.

EE 670 SIMULATION OF BUSINESS PROCESSES

This course will present methodologies for the efficient simulation of production and business operations. The theory of queuing systems and the simulation of discrete system processes will be developed. Upon completion of this course, students will understand the theoretical basis of discrete system simulation and will be able to use commercial simulation software to analyze and predict traffic and queuing patterns in such systems.

EE 689 MOBILE COMPUTING

Mobile computing comprises wireless communication infrastructures and portable computing devices. The goal of this course is to provide a balanced mix of topics and open discussion about the technologies to address the challenges and solutions that facilitate mobile computing growth. Topics include mobile and wireless networking, operating systems and middleware, and product and application design and development. This course does not require previous programming experience.

For more information about courses and requirements for the electrical engineering graduate program, see the course catalog.