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/academics/schools/engineering/undergraduate/electrical/
 

Contact

    • School of Engineering

      • Kirkbride Hall
      • tel: 610-499-4037
      • fax: 610-499-4059
    • Dr. Sohail Sheikh

      • Chairman of Electrical Engineering
      • Kirkbride Hall, Room 369A
      • tel: 610-499-4567
      • ssheikh@widener.edu
    • Jill Gilbert

Curriculum, Electrical Engineering

Requirements

The electrical engineering program requires 133 credit-hours to graduate. It requires mathematics, chemistry, and physics, which totals to more than 30 credit-hours of lecture courses and lab experience. This is followed by 26 credit-hours of engineering sciences. In addition, students must satisfy the university HUM/SOC electives. The program also includes 45 credit-hours of electrical engineering courses that provide a solid foundation in electrical engineering. The program also requires a year-long senior project.

Courses

Here is a selection of courses students typically take as an electrical engineering major.

EE 220 LINEAR ELECTRICAL SYSTEMS

Students are introduced to the concepts of linear systems theory as applied to electrical networks. AC steady state analysis, frequency response, two-port models, Fourier series, and Laplace transforms are covered.

EE 230 LOGIC DESIGN

An introduction to digital system design methods including Boolean algebra, minimization of combinational switching functions, Karnaugh maps, the Quine-McClusky method, number systems, typical logic gates, codes, code conversion methods, design of sequential switching circuits, flip-flops, electronic switching circuit packages, and typical design problems.

EE 345 JUNIOR DESIGN LABORATORY

Students are presented with an open-ended, technical problem(s) and must use relevant theory, analysis methods, and laboratory practice learned in earlier coursework to meet the goals of the design. A formal written report is required, as well as an oral presentation.

EE 346 INTRODUCTION TO SIGNAL ANALYSIS

This course focuses on the representation, design, and analysis of continuous and discrete time signals and systems. Topics include convolution, Fourier series, Fourier transforms, Nyquist sampling theorem, z transform, and linear filters.

EE 347 INTRODUCTION TO ELECTRONICS

Students are introduced to the operation of solid state devices at the circuit component level through various circuit device models. Analytical techniques include small signal circuit models, biasing considerations, switching models, and AC/DC load lines. The PN junction diode, Zener diode, BJT, and FET families of transistors are presented. Circuit models for operational amplifier applications are included.

EE 471 CONTROLS I

Modeling of physical systems including electromechanical systems. Reduction of block diagrams. Signal flow graphs and Mason’s gain formula. Response of second order systems: natural frequency and damping ratio and how they relate to rise-time, peak-time, settlingtime, and overshoot. Stability and the Routh-Hurwitz criterion. Steady-state error and sensitivity. Root locus. Design of cascade compensators using root locus and frequency response.

EE 473 COMPUTERS I

An introduction to computer system architecture; evolution of computer systems; performance criteria; instructions, addressing modes, subroutines, encoding of machine instructions; program examples using real machines; RAM, ROM, and cache memories; virtual memories; memory management requirements; secondary storage; computer arithmetic such as addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division using signed/unsigned and floating-point numbers; I/O organization; and hardwired and microprogram controllers.

EE 477 COMMUNICATIONS SYSTEMS

An introduction to the theory and design of digital and analog communication systems. Includes a brief review of the Fourier transform, Fourier series, and signal analysis. The generation, detection, design, and performance of baseband pulse modulation, bandpass digital modulation, and analog modulation systems are discussed. If time permits, additional topics may include link budget analysis and spread spectrum systems.

For more information about courses and requirements for electrical engineering, see the course catalog.