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    • Academic Center North
    • Tel: 610-499-1101
    • Fax: 610-499-1106
  • Nancy Keating

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Student Research, Master's Degree in Hospitality & Tourism

As part of the graduate program in hospitality & tourism, students complete a research paper. It can be either a 3-credit monograph or 6-credit thesis. After completion, many students modify their research papers for a conference presentation or publication.

Listed below are several examples:

Mass Media on Tourist Perceptions

Khan, H., Chen McCain, S. L., & Lolli, J. (July 2014). “The Impact of Mass Media on Tourist Perceptions of Destination Image, And How It Impacts Travel Intentions of Local Tourists In Pakistan.” Annual meeting of the International Council on Hotel, Restaurant, and Institutional Education, San Diego, CA.

This study examined the impact of mass media on tourist perceptions of destination image and how these perceptions impact travel intention of domestic tourists in Pakistan. The results indicated that agenda setting has impact on four of the five types of cognitive image except facilitator image. Furthermore, agenda setting has no impact on affective image. Finally, both cognitive and affective image have impact on travel intention. 

Full- and Part-Time Lodging Employees

Al Omar, A., J. Lolli., McCain, S.L., & Dickerson, J. (July 2011). “A Comparison Between Full and Part-Time Lodging Employees on Job Satisfaction, Organizational Commitment, and Job Performance.” Annual meeting of the International Council on Hotel, Restaurant, and Institutional Education, Denver, CO.

Researchers have speculated that full-time employees differ from part-time employees regarding job satisfaction, organizational commitment, job performance, and OCB (organizational citizenship behavior—a type of job performance). The results indicated no statistically significant difference between full- and part-time employees regarding their job satisfaction. On the other hand, there were statistically significant differences between full- and part-time employees regarding organizational commitment, job performance, and OCB.

Female Managers in the Workplace

Ntumba. L., & Chen McCain, S.L. (Jan 2010). “Push and Pull Factors: Influence on Female Managers and Executives’ Exit From the Workplace, Impact on Job Satisfaction and Organizational Commitment.” 15 Annual Graduate Student Research Conference, Washington, D.C.

Women experience difficulties advancing in their careers because of various factors that Hewlett and Luce (2005) divided in two separate categories called “push” and “pull.” This research attempted to determine how those factors negatively influence job satisfaction as well as organizational commitment, and therefore increase women’s propensity to leave the workforce even after they have achieved somewhat high levels in their career. Ultimately, the research provided recommendations to assist organizations in implementing effective retention initiatives.