Katherine R. Goodrich

Katherine R. Goodrich, PhD

  • Associate Professor
Media Expertise:
  • Science & Environment

Programs I Teach

Education

  • PhD, Plant Biology (2008)
    University of South Carolina (SC)

About Me

I believe students should experience science as an active and exciting process. To this end, I work to incorporate active and hypothesis-driven learning activities in my teaching. At the same time, I strive to incorporate effective teaching into student research carried out in my lab. I also believe that students should possess the ability to articulate scientific theories and concepts and develop well-reasoned scientific arguments.

I connect scientific writing to laboratory research by encouraging students to prepare research proposals, to seek outside grant support, and to participate in the authorship of publishable results. My ultimate goal is to help train inquisitive and scientifically literate individuals and inspire young scientists by engaging undergraduates. For more information on my background and teaching, visit my webpage. My research focuses on the diverse interface between plants and insects.

Plant-insect interactions are incredibly diverse and can largely be divided into interactions where plants co-opt insects as pollen vectors (for plant reproduction) and interactions where insects utilize plants as food sources and brood sites. Frequently these two sets of interactions are interrelated. I find it important to consider (1) insect perception of plant cues such as scent, color, shape, and texture, and (2) the multiple contexts in which plant cues, especially scent, may be used by the insect community. Specifically, I am interested in ecological (multi-trophic) interactions related to floral and vegetative scents and how plant-to-insect olfactory signals function in concert with visual and/or tactile plant cues. For more information on my research, visit my webpage.

Research Interests

My research focuses on the diverse interface between plants and insects. Plant-insect interactions are incredibly diverse and can largely be divided into interactions where plants co-opt insects as pollen vectors (for plant reproduction) and interactions where insects utilize plants as food sources and brood sites. Frequently these two sets of interactions are interrelated. I find it important to consider (1) insect perception of plant cues such as scent, color, shape, and texture, and (2) the multiple contexts in which plant cues, especially scent, may be used by the insect community.

Specifically, I am interested in ecological (multi-trophic) interactions related to floral and vegetative scents and how plant-to-insect olfactory signals function in concert with visual and/or tactile plant cues.

Publications

  • Van Bramer S.E., & Goodrich, K.R. (2015). Determination of plant volatiles using solid phase microextraction GC-MS. Journal of Chemical Education.
  • Goodrich, K.R. (2014). Floral scent in Annonaceae. Botanical Journal of the Linnean Society, 169(1), 262–279.
  • Goodrich, K.R., & Raguso, R.A. (2009). The odor component of floral display in Asimina and Deeringothamnus (Annonaceae). New Phytologist, 183(2), 457–469.

Professional Affiliations & Memberships

Botanical Society of America (BSA), Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology (SICB)

Awards

  • Provost Grant, Widener University Funding for Research (2015–2016)
  • Faculty Development Grant, Widener University, Funding for research (2015–2016)
  • Provost Grant, Widener University, Funding for research (2014–2015)

News

Noteworthy

  • Associate Professor Katherine Goodrich Presents Lecture at Harvard University

    Associate Professor of Biology Katherine Goodrich, who is also the Cynthia H. Sarnoski Science Faculty Fellow, presented a lecture at the Harvard University Herbaria Seminar Series on March 10. The invited lecture, "Flowers, flies, and fermentation: floral mimicry and pollination ecology of pawpaw," focused on Goodrich's research on the pollination of the pawpaw, a tree native to United States and Canada that smells of fermenting fruit to attract fruit-loving flies for pollination.

    Share link: https://www.widener.edu/news/noteworthy/associate-professor-katherine-goodrich-presents-lecture-harvard-university